A Day Out With Elspeth in Durham

Digital Camera

Welcome to Durham – World Heritage city!

I’ve already given this city a long Naughty Guide entry, but on revisiting, I would like to revise some of my comments.

Despite the coolness that some visitors have felt, a child’s response to Durham cathedral is that they wanted to hug it; even that they felt it was hugging them. That’s my maternal pillars at work.

I said that despite being a Friend of the cathedral they were not a friend to me – but I just had a vastly improved experience, not only of staff and volunteers, but the whole city.

My only two gripes are the £10 card minimum spend in the shop – not elsewhere in the cathedral – and that staff didn’t see that had I not had change they would have lost their precious sale.

The other was not unique to Durham and that’s that stewards were talking throughout services.

They still used that black line – to hold non worshippers back on Sunday mornings.

But I like that commerce comes after worship and you have to wait till 12.30 on Sundays for non religious activities. It would be useful for that to be clearer to visitors.

I didn’t mind paying to go round the exhibition, though it was a bit steep in price – £7.50 – as it was a voluntary way of giving the cathedral income without having to pay to enter the church. The cafe is simple but atmospheric and the shop opposite is large and I was happy to give both my support.

The Open Treasure exhibition involves two fantastic rooms – the huge monk’s dormitory and the octagonal kitchen. Volunteers were very friendly and there was no snobbery at all.

They even have an alternative youth service – Pulse – but alas I was unable to sample that.

Silver Street and the old Elvet Bridge

The castle tour was by a warm and knowledgeable young man (though one correction: St Andrews university is way older than Durham’s – it’s 15th C!) who cut all the stupid in college jokes that annoyed me before.

I had time to potter further in Durham. Often it’s been a day sandwich from Newcastle but this time I reversed that and spent the majority of my trip in the land of former prince bishops. Doing it that way round gave me a different perspective. I was again enchanted by the peace of the riverside walks which extend beyond the peninsula.

However, I was not enchanted by the greeting site of the huge holes to make retail centres and accommodation. The signs say they’re giving Durham its river back – but lumpy bog standard and too high developments is hardly doing so! It made me realise that the Gates shopping centre was actually quite thoughtful in scale and detailing. Durham size cities are charming because they don’t have malls and multiplexes. Not what a World Heritage Site needs.

I walked beyond the little peninsula this time more than before. It’s true that Saddler St is the star olde street in the island, leading into the bailey. Silver St has only one obvious ancient building. And there aren’t many others to mention – inside the river loop is hogged by those Norman institutions.

But over either of the ancient bridges, and interesting buildings continue. The Elvets don’t have many pubs or shops but they are pleasing architecturally. There is also Hallgarth street and Church St on this side – the one with the old country hall and St Oswald’s.

South St now has a little art gallery, but nothing else to see, but the peace and the view are worth the walk alone. Beyond and up more characteristic steep streets is Crossgate with a few pubs and Dark Matter comics cafe, which helped change my view of Durham. The streets are very colourful up here and are emulated close to where you descend from the station.

Claypath also has some older buildings and several places to eat and drink. It too is blighted by a large hole at present. It felt a little more North Easterly by night – ie boisterous.

My comments about limited nightlife remain, although these hulking developments are bringing in an overkill of these. Millennium Place now is surrounded by chain bars, making a theatrical visit potentially noisy. I share my thoughts on Durham cinema here:

Like many places, Durham no longer has a visitable tourist information centre, but you can obtain leaflets from the Gala theatre, the Town Hall (not weekends), the Indoor Market, World Heritage Site visitor centre (which is small) and Palace Green Library which incorporates some of the now closed Durham Light Infantry museum as well as archaeology. The latter two are happy to give general information.

So Durham, I have forgiven you and I am glad that I had time to linger this time. I came home with warm thoughts, and even felt some of the Celtic magic.

 

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